Category Articles

New Topic Feeds

Listeners have had difficulty finding the Software Engineering Daily content they want to listen to. We are creating new podcast feeds to address this. The content on each podcast feed is mutually exclusive from the other feeds, except for the main feed and “Greatest Hits.” You can now find the following podcast feeds in iTunes and Google Play: Software Engineering Daily (main feed): the classic Software Engineering Daily feed–we recently

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Sorry We Crashed Your Podcast Player

We started putting transcripts in some of our podcast posts 2 months ago. Each transcription was an hour’s worth of audio conversation, which equaled a LOT of text when transcribed. Recently, several listeners wrote in asking why their podcast player was crashing. If you use the iPhone native podcast app, requesting all of these transcripts probably caused your podcast player to crash. It certainly caused mine to crash. Until a

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Our Editorial Philosophy

Software Engineering Daily started as a daily podcast about how to build software. Following my own interests, the show evolved toward a discussion of how to create a software company as much as how to build the software itself. Even after 400 episodes of Software Engineering Daily, our coverage continues to inspire me and fill me with a sense of empowerment. Anyone who wants to build a technology company should

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Adforprize

http://traffic.libsyn.com/sedaily/adforprize_edited_fixed.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadThere are multiple paths to constructing a piece of software from start to finish. An individual programmer can build an entire product from scratch in a couple days. A giant corporation can commission a project and delegate responsibilities to hundreds of people. An open source community can use the wisdom of the crowds to efficiently build an operating system. Today’s episode is about another

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Poker and Software Engineering

http://traffic.libsyn.com/sedaily/poker_and_software_engineering.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadThe last editorial we did was 10 Philosophies for Engineers. Listeners enjoyed that episode, so we decided to do another. 10 Philosophies was a collection of beliefs I have about the software engineering industry, and how we can find fulfillment in our work as engineers. The philosophies that I discussed were rooted in my experiences working as a computer science student and as an

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What are the differences between Druid and AWS Redshift?

From Eric Tschetter’s answer via Quora: The difference you are asking about though is ParAccel vs. Druid.  ParAccel is the software that Amazon is licensing for RedShift. Aside from just potential differences in performance, there are some functional differences (these are all based on a cursory understanding of what ParAccel does, I’ve read what I could find on it, but a lot of my understanding is extracted from interpretations of marketing

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Competition in the Open Source Ecosystem

From Eric Sammer’s answer via Quora: At Cloudera (company) we regularly work on open source code right along side our competitors. I tend to joke that the engineers at our competitors are effectively our coworkers. Since the question specifically asks about how one deals with code (rather than the working relationship) I’ll focus on that. Honestly though, that’s probably the less interesting part. In (almost) all ways, our engineers shed their

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Is Scala a better choice than Python for Apache Spark?

From Marcin Mejran’s answer via Quora: If you mean the API then it depends. First of all, performance won’t most likely matter since it’s almost all Scala under the hood for Spark and you can always use more machines to make up for anything else. Learning curves can be overcome and Spark’s Scala API is rather simple. Ease of use is a toss up honestly and probably the key point to

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Apache Kafka’s Uses and Target Market

From Nicolae Marasoiu’s answer via Quora: Kafka is a high performance messaging system which provides an immutable, linearizable, sharded log of messages. Throughput and storage capacity scale linearly with nodes. Kafka can push astonishingly high volume through each node; often saturating disk, network, or both, while keeping a low cpu utilization. You would use Kafka in scenarios of asynchronous communication and processing pipelines, predominantly in distributed systems, cloud & big data,

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President Obama’s Hour of Code

From Hadi Partovi’s answer via Quora: This is a great story. Code.org launched in February, 2013 with a video (What Most Schools Don’t Teach).  At that time, we had little more than a video, a great name, and a web site. I was a one-man team at the time, with no full-time staff, nor cash in the bank. Even the volunteers and contractors who had made the video had finished their

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Want to learn Ruby on Rails? Start Here…

From Felix Oginni’s post via Quora: I got the Job. My first project was to build a text messaging application that talks to Wolfram Alpha using the Twilio Api. …Ooo snap. I’m in deep shit now!. He’s going to fire me, I don’t know how to build that! Why did I even apply? *screams* HELP! We had a Skype conversation and he introduced me to the team… and the tech stack

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Computational Biology: A Brief Introduction

From Anonymous’s answer via Quora: Computational Biology is the use of computer models to study or analyze biological systems. Typically, computational biology is good for studying biological systems that: Are made up of hundreds or thousands or millions of components The components are relatively simple For these kinds of objects, looking at them under a microscope or in a lab or something doesn’t really help you see how the pieces fit

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PhD in Computer Science: Advantages and Disadvantages

From Tracy Chou’s answer via Quora: Advantages career opportunities A Computer Science Ph.D gives you a huge advantage for industry research labs, like Google Research. On occasion such labs accept people who only have master’s degrees, but this is extremely rare. A CS PhD also gives you an advantage for some quantitative finance positions, assuming your PhD is mathematical and algorithmic in nature. For some companies (typically larger ones), having a CS

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Python Scientific Libraries vs. MATLAB

From Chris Riederer’s answer via Quora: I first learned to program using MATLAB. Now, as a computer science Ph.D. student, I try to use Python for everything. (For the rest of this post, I’m going to say “SciPy” to collectively refer to NumPy, Matplotlib, and SciPy.) MATLAB and SciPy both seem to be particularly good at: Rapid prototyping Research code Large numerical or matrix computations Data analysis The main differentiators are: Use

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How to Compare Databases

From Chris Schrader’s answer via Quora: Someone could write a 5000 page book on this subject but I’ll do my best at a high level. SQL Databases I break these down into to three basic groups:  Traditional, MPP, columnar,  and an emerging technology called NewSQL. Traditional These are the usual databases that we’ve seen for years.  Some vendors might includeMySQL, PostgreSQL, SQL Server (product), Sybase, Oracle Database, etc.  They comply with

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Internet Explorer’s Decline Into Maintenance

From Hadi Partovi’s answer via Quora: I was part of the Internet Explorer leadership and ran Program Management through the launch of Internet Explorer 5.0, so I can talk about what made Internet Explorer amazing during the “good years” (the 1990s). Back in the mid-late 1990s, Microsoft recruited its absolute sharpest talent to work on the Internet problem.. or the browser (IE) and server (IIS) teams. The vice president in charge

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PhD Student Emotions: The 4 Phases

From Matt Might’s answer via Quora: I got my Ph.D. in CS, dabbled in start-ups (once unsuccessfully, once with marginal success) and then returned to academia as a professor.  I’ll contrast these two lifestyles as best I can. The Ph.D. student experience follows a predictable path: Phase I: Excitement. Phase II: Depression. Phase III: Excitement. Phase IV: Extreme depression or extreme excitement. Phase I is when new Ph.D. students get excited

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Digital Ocean vs AWS

From Stephen Punwasi’s answer via Quora: I use (and love) both for different reasons, and there’s different case scenarios to use each of them. It’s best to figure out what you are going to do with your project first, consider what your needs are, and then evaluate it accordingly. Here are some things I’ve noticed: Set up on both are pretty straight forward, except Digital Ocean has a nicer UX

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10 Philosophies for Engineers

http://traffic.libsyn.com/sedaily/10_philosophies.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadFollowing the successful experiment of History of Hadoop, we are doing another Saturday experiment: an editorial podcast. Let us know your thoughts via Slack, Twitter, or email! Our podcast errs on the side of technical rigor. Whether the topic is distributed databases, microservices, Soylent, Uber, or Dwarf Fortress, we try to separate hype from substance, deferring the narrative to the guest. With that deference there is editorial

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Koding’s Migration From Containers to Virtual Machines

From Devrim Yasar‘s answer via Quora: Why did Koding move away from containers and Docker to virtual machines? I’ve been thinking about writing a blog post around the notion of “Engineering for Scale” until that happens, here we go. When we did our internal testing with LXC’s in late 2011, we were really excited because they allowed us to produce super cheap, root-enabled VMs for our users. Due to the low

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